Great Tip: Grate Butter

Grate Cold Butter

Your stick of butter has to be close to frozen for it to work, and you must work fast to keep it from melting, but the grated butter is perfect for adding to flour before baking biscuits, scones, muffins, etc.. It also makes the butter melt much faster, so if your butter is too cold to spread, consider grating it first and then topping toast, veggies, or a baked potato!

Small Kitchen Decorating Ideas

Small kitchen table

Bigger is not always better, especially when we’re talking kitchens. Small kitchens are usually more efficient workspaces than large ones. Space and good design aren’t exclusive to a large kitchen — all you need are some good small kitchen decorating ideas that keep your small space organized, functional and beautiful.

“If you can organize your kitchen, you can organize your life.” — Louis Parrish

We’ve put together some small-kitchen decorating ideas that tackle the following issues with good design solutions. The three most common small-kitchen complaints are clutter, lack of counter space and a dark kitchen.

Clutter is usually a side effect of not having enough storage. Often, more storage isn’t the solution — simplifying and decluttering your kitchen is. Go through your cabinets and drawers (especially the back) and donate or toss anything that you haven’t used for a while. Ask yourself if you really need a cherry-pitting tool or an egg slicer. Once you’ve cleared the cabinets, clear the counters by storing the items that cause visual clutter.

You’ve reclaimed some counter space, but do you still feel like it’s not enough? That’s a common issue. We have ideas for maximizing (and even adding) more counter space to your small kitchen, including a trick for turning your sink into a cutting board.

Source: FreshHome

Farm House Charm Kitchen Shelving

Kitchen shelving

Combine function with decorative flair. The open shelving in this cottage-style kitchen provides a roomy expanse of storage, but it’s also an opportunity to enhance the decor. Vintage pewter, china and other dishware mingle with practical supplies such as plates and glasses. The openness of the shelves also helps to preserve the serene, airy feel of the space and lends an old-fashioned note, evoking an era when most kitchens featured utilitarian shelves rather than banks of cabinetry.

Source: diynetwork

Low Cost Kitchen Updates

Cozy Up the Work Space

A colorful or patterned rug instantly gives you a low cost kitchen update with personality and comfort. Plus, a comfy rug adds warmth underfoot and a touch of homeyness to your hardworking kitchen space. Consider placing a rug in areas of the kitchen such as in front of the range, refrigerator, or sink, where you tend to do a lot of standing. Be sure to place a slip-prevention mat beneath the rug for safety.

Refreshing Change

The quickest way to rev up your kitchen’s style quotient is to roll on a fresh coat of paint. With so many color choices available in wipe-clean paints, drab cabinets or walls can be banished in a weekend. A burst of cheery yellow cabinetry, tempered by a rich wooden island and floors and a white beaded-board ceiling, cozies up this room.

Stylish Faucets

Spruce up your kitchen sink with a new faucet. Often overlooked kitchen elements, faucets are truly valuable style-setters. Faucets come in a limited number of metals, so to start you’ll need to settle on a finish. After you’ve decided on a finish, search your favorite brands for models that suit your needs and your kitchen’s style.

Source: BHG.com

Finding the Best Paint Colors for Your Kitchen

Paint Color Basics

Tip #1: Colors can change
Keep in mind that natural sunlight in the kitchen will change in intensity throughout the day. Morning light appears differently than evening light, and shadows can affect the color perception. Color is essentially light – how we perceive a color depends greatly on how light is reflecting off of that color. There is a term used to describe this color-changing experience: illuminant metameric failure. It simply means that two colors may look similar in one light condition but might not match in another. So understanding the light patterns in your kitchen, and knowing what other colors will be going into the kitchen, is incredibly important.

Tip #2: Select your paint color at home
Don’t choose a paint color while standing in the paint store aisle. Bring home actual paint samples (many brands offer small sample jars) that you can apply to your walls. Paint these swatches next to cabinetry, flooring, countertops and any fabrics you plan on using in the space. Observe how the paint changes during the day and notice if any of your other kitchen materials are affected by light hitting the paint and reflecting onto the surface. For example, a strong red wall color may, at certain times of the day, reflect a pink hue onto white cabinetry or flooring.

Tip #3: Warm colors work
There’s a reason we see a lot of warm, earthy tones in the kitchen. Kitchens harken back the days of open fires and slow roasted foods. Studies have shown that our appetites increase when we see red or orange colors. Although warm hues may be a popular choice for kitchens, it doesn’t mean you have to ignore blues and greens. Pair cool tones with warm neutrals like a warm gray or warm orange. You’ll be surprised how mixing the palette can create the kitchen of your dreams.

Tip #4: Paint isn’t just for walls
Don’t forget that paint can be used on a variety of kitchen elements: cabinets, tables, chairs and other decorative objects. If your favorite paint color won’t work on the walls, try using it on a piece of furniture instead. Vintage pieces or new pieces can be painted (or spray painted). Test the underside or backside first to make sure you’ve selected the right type of paint for your project.

Source: Huffington Post – Full Article

Grandma’s Kitchen Secrets

Here are some “secrets” from Grandma to make life easier in the kitchen!

1. If you plan to frost your cake, sprinkle it lightly with flour as soon as it comes out of the oven. The frosting will spread more easily and is more likely to stay on the cake, rather than sliding off and ending up on the serving plate.

2.  Microwave popcorn may be convenient, but nothing beats the flavor of corn popped the old fashioned way, on the stovetop or in an air popper. For fewer “old maids” (kernels that don’t pop), soak the kernels in water for 10 minutes first. The added moisture helps them pop with quicker and more even results.

3.  Dip cooking shears or a clean pair of scissors into water before using them to cut through dried fruit or marshmallows. The wetness of the blades will keep these sticky items from adhering to the shears, making them easier to cut through.

Source: Parade.com