Best Time to Start Home Remodeling Projects – OMG!

When is the best time to start home remodeling projects? During the holidays, of course! Say what? Yes, you read that right. The holidays are the perfect time to start planning a renovation project, and here are three reasons why. 

  1. It takes time
  2. Delays are bound to happen
  3. Income Tax refunds can help

Kitchen and Bath Overhauls Take Time

Kitchen and Bath overhauls don’t happen overnight. There is much time needed planning, designing, and ordering before we can even think about demolishing your space. Of course, actual times vary between the size of the project and the complexity of the remodel. However, we can safely say that none of our projects will ever start with us demolishing first. The demo of your space can take seven to ten days. Not to mention, it’s easier for us to erase a line on paper and redraw it than it is for us to construct and drywall an area of the wall we’ve knocked down. When planning your kitchen or bath remodel, take your time. Please don’t rush into decisions because, ultimately, you need to be satisfied once we complete the job. So, take as much time as you need planning and designing that new space.

Delays Are Bound to Happen

Delays don’t necessarily mean that someone messed up. Setbacks happen because of long-lead times that our clients and we experience when ordering custom cabinetry, stone products, and other specialty items. Once an order is approved, some of these items take up to two months to build before they are ready for delivery. Other setbacks can include not being able to obtain permits. There have been cases where city permits take longer than expected. Remember, we are only talking about a few of the setbacks right now.

Income Tax Refund Relief

Homeowners often don’t realize how much a renovation and construction projects cost until it has been thoroughly planned out. That is when starting to plan in November and December for a remodel scheduled for February or March becomes necessary. Not only will it allow for some time to save money, but it would be perfect timing for that income tax refund to provide some additional financial assistance. So what are you waiting for; get your family involved while they are around for the holidays and start planning. Don’t wait to start. Give us a call we will gladly walk you through our process and help you get the space of your dreams!

 

Home Remodeling Project Pre-planning Tips – OMG! Kitchen & Bath

Starting a home remodeling project can be daunting. The thought of being without your kitchen or bathroom for 4-6 weeks can create an enormous amount of anxiety and stress. Remodeling projects can be hectic, crazy, and frustrating. However, with a bit of pre-planning, you can have fun while creating your dream space.

Here is a list by OMG! Kitchen & Bath to help you prepare.

  1. Empty the Rooms.

Protect or relocate anything of value. The remodeling process can often unintendedly cause damage to valuables. If you are unable to empty a room providing clear paths and covering furniture will help. Cleaning and decluttering countertops and cabinets will also keep items from getting dirty, damaged, or otherwise misplaced.

  1. Think About Kids and Pets.

Consider fall a perfect time to start remodel projects. Children are often in school during the day, and this allows for a reduction of foot traffic within the home.

Renovation projects come with unfamiliar people and noises. Noises can cause an enormous amount of anxiety and agitation for your animal family members. Consider daycare options, pet sitters, or simply crates to keep them safe and out of harm’s way.

  1. Expect the Unexpected.

Sometimes, no matter how much planning you do, there are surprises. Having reserve funds set aside and being in contestant communication with your contractor will help.

Setback will happen, and if you and your contractor are on the same page, these things can be handled promptly.

  1. Have Fun with It.

Keep your eye on the prize. Embrace the process, even during the moment. Regardless if dust is flying all over your house, and your furniture is all over the place. Remember the result, will be the remodel of your dreams. Don’t forget to take pictures before, during, and after – so you can later show your friends and family.

General Tips for Kitchen & Bath Remodels

If you are doing a kitchen remodel, we recommend temporary kitchens. Set up a space in another part of your home that can have the basic functionality of a kitchen. Microwaves, Instant Pot, crockpots, electric grills, and even Refrigerators can temporarily be set up just about anywhere.

For example, when OMG! works in a kitchen, we make sure our team moves the refrigerator, microwave, and any other appliances. So you can continue to live “normally” while we build your kitchen beautiful.

Bathroom Remodel

The bathroom is the room that people renovate most often. Bathroom remodeling can turn the most personal and private room in your house into a roaring mess filled with dust, noise, and traffic. Again, if you only have one bathroom in your home, ask your contractor if they will set up a makeshift bathroom. If you have more than one bathroom to use, be sure to transfer all necessary items over into the other bathroom before the construction begins. Think about bathing schedules and usage times. If possible, ask a neighbor, stay with a family member, or even consider getting an outdoor shower used for camping.

Finally, remember – before demolition begins, meet with your designer consultant and contractor. This way, you will ensure that you understand the scope-of-work and how it will affect your life during the process.

At OMG! Kitchen & Bath, we pride ourselves on communication and make sure to let our clients know when obstacles arise. We offer the best solution to the problem and make sure the project continues and achieves the expected results.

At OMG! Kitchen & Bath we give start and completion dates in writing before any work begins, giving the customer time to plan accordingly.

Bathroom of the Future

The Virginia Tech Center for Design Research brought its FutureHAUS Bathroom to Design & Construction Week in recently in Las Vegas. (Last year, it debuted its FutureHAUS Kitchen, which was just as ambitious and futuristic as this year’s offering.) A joint project of the school’s architecture and computer science programs, the FutureHAUS Bathroom shows what’s possible in home design. Some of the amenities that are integrated into the project bathroom include:

  • A bathroom mirror with customizable readouts for weather, traffic, TV display and more
  • A shower system that lets you know when you’re low on shower gel, conditioner or shampoo and places an online order for the item before you run out
  • Flooring that sends out an alert if a bathroom occupant falls
  • A chromatherapy-jetted tub for comfort
  • A high-tech bidet-style toilet with Bluetooth capability

It’s safe to say that when it comes to technology, the possibilities are endless.

How to Light A Bathroom

Too often lighting a bathroom is low on the list of priorities relative to other rooms in the house. But with bathrooms becoming larger and more elaborate, proper lighting is essential to making the most of the space.

Your bath should be bright and clean.
Ample overhead and task lighting are key. But bathrooms are now a room in the house where people are spending a lot more time, so you’ll also want the ability to create an atmosphere that’s relaxing and spa–like. Having flexibility to adjust the lighting is really important, which is why you should add dimmers here just like you do throughout the house.

Start With the Ceiling and Vanity Light, Then Work Your Way Down
First, ceiling–mounted or recessed lighting overhead for general illumination. You’ll also want to light the vanity area with some excellent task lighting, which can be a fixture above the mirror or sconces on either side. And you need to light the shower and tub area. You might also consider strip lighting under wall–mounted cabinets, which makes them appear to float in space, as well as illumination for wall art.

Don’t Overdo It, But Don’t Under-Do It Either
People often have a tendency to pop a dozen can lights into the ceiling to make sure the bathroom is bright enough, but then you end up with a ceiling that looks like Swiss cheese. Everything in moderation. Though, don’t make the mistake of under-lighting your bathroom, because ample lighting is important. Another reason dimmers are key.

Source: ylighting.com

Handicap Accessible Master Bath

Handicap accessible master bath

 

We were able to provide a family with a handicap accessible master bath. The Narendorf family called us after one of their family members had a stroke. We can help with when these unfortunate life events occur. They needed to remodel the master bath to make it Handicap accessible, so they called omg kitchen & bath. We pulled the Garden tub and converted it to a large roll in shower, removed the existing small shower and en-larged the water closet, installed a schluter shower system, glass block window, wheel chair accessible sink, tile floors, shelving and paint. Also a Delta shower wand system and Stainless steel grab bars through out.

Watch the transformation!

 

Choosing a Bathroom Vanity Top

 

If you’re looking for a bathroom countertop—usually called a vanity top—look for something that will stand up to water, soap, toothpaste, cosmetics, and alcohol- and acetone-based liquids. Replacing a vanity top is a feasible do-it-yourself project since you don’t have to replace the whole vanity cabinet if you don’t want to. Most bathroom vanity tops are surfaced with one of the following five materials.

  • Granite and marble
  • Laminate
  • Solid surface material
  • Tile
  • Wood

Granite and Marble

Though marble and granite are unrivaled for their beauty, at $125 to $250 per running, or linear, foot (as measured from one end of the counter to the other), these classic materials warrant careful thought. Also, while marble stains easily, granite shrugs off most stains, except grease, especially if the granite is unsealed. If a solid sheet of stone for your coun­tertop is beyond your budget, granite or marble tiles may be substituted at a lower cost.

Cultured marble is less expensive and is made from real chips of natural marble embedded in plastic. It’s available in sheet form and in standard counter dimensions of 19 and 22 inches deep. Cultured marble comes with or without a wash basin molded into it, for $50 to $80 per running foot, installed. Although easy to clean, cultured marble must be well cared for. Once scratched, it cannot be resurfaced. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for what type of finish to apply to cultured marble to best protect it.

Laminate

At an installed price of $24 to $50 per running foot, laminate offers good value and per­formance. As a result, it’s the most widely used countertop material in bathrooms, just as it is in kitchens. Various manufacturers market laminates under different brand names, but they’re all based on the same principle—a stack of thin plastic layers bonded together under heat and pressure. Laminate countertops clean easily and are resis­tant to water and stain. However, laminates can burn, wear thin, and dull over time. Hard blows can chip or dent the plastic, and there’s no remedy short of replacement.

Available in many colors and patterns, lami­nate finishes range in texture from high-gloss smoothness to a mottled, leather-like look. Dealers usually have a few standard patterns in stock; you can view color chips in the store to order others

Do-it-yourselfers can buy prefabricated lami­nate vanity tops or have them made to order with a hole for the sink cut where needed. Installing the finished countertop is a fairly easy matter. You can apply pieces of laminate material to an installed particleboard countertop, but a professional will do the job best.

Solid Surface

Solid surface countertops offer many of the advantages of stone with few of the drawbacks. Cast from an acrylic resin that sometimes include crushed stone—particularly quartz—solid-surface material demands little maintenance and is extremely durable. Intense heat and heavy falling objects (which shouldn’t pose much of a threat in bath­rooms) can cause damage, but scratches, abra­sions, and even minor burns (if you leave a curling iron on the vanity top, for example) can be repaired with fine-grade sandpaper. The methods and tools needed for working with this material are similar to those required for woodworking. However, some manufacturers require that a trained pro­fessional install their materials.

Solid surface material is available in white, beige, pastels, and imitation stone, usually in ready-formed  vanity tops with integrated sinks. Prices range from about $100 to $250 per running foot installed.

Tile

As it does for floors and walls, ceramic tile makes an attractive, durable finish for countertops. It’s available in many colors, designs, and textures. Grout lines that trap dirt and encourage mildew are a major drawback, although new grouts and sealers help alleviate these problems to some degree. Costs range from $10 to $40 per running foot installed.

Getting professional results with tile is a chal­lenge for do-it-yourselfers. A slightly irregular look can be appropriate for rustic, unglazed quarry tile, but most other tile varieties demand greater precision. Using pregrouted tile sheets, or sheets of mosaic tile on a mesh backing, makes it easier to space tiles evenly.

Wood

As a countertop surface, wood is attractive, versa­tile, and easy to install. It is, however, especially vulnerable to water damage, and its porosity makes it difficult to keep clean. All hardwood and softwood species must be well sealed with polyurethane or marine varnish. Special care should be taken to seal around the edges of plumbing fixtures so standing water can’t seep in and cause wood rot.

Source: National Kitchen Bath Association